College Music Society National Conference

Friday, I received a nice letter from the College Music Society. They selected my conference proposal! Jennifer Jones Mitchell and I will be presenting at the 2016 CMS National Conference in Santa Fe. We’re excited! Our topic is “Marketing Your Music Online: A Guide to Social Media for The Musician”.

The conference will be late October at at the Eldorado Hotel & Spa, the Hilton Santa Fe Historic Plaza, and St. Francis Auditorium in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

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The Bells

Here’s an interesting new composition. It’s a piece I wrote for Vocal Essence, “one of the world’s premier choral music organizations” according to their website. They host an annual choral music competition. The guidelines called for a Christmas carol featuring Scandinavia violin and chorus. Unfortunately, I missed the deadline.

I finished the piece of course, and it was selected by the Southeastern Composers League for their annual concert series. And I must say, the Campbell University Chorus conducted by Dr. Phillip Morrow featuring Lucy Greenleaf-Carter on violin did a wonderful!

This piece is a setting of Edgar Allan Poe’s poem “The Bells”. The fast moving violin part creates a feeling of nervous energy. It’s intended to sound like snowflakes swirling in the air on a cold Christmas night in the dead of winter. The chorus mimics the sound of bells ringing at the stroke of midnight across a frozen city scape.

Dr. David Mitchell’s Composition “The Bells” to be Performed by Campbell University Chorus

Dr. Mitchell’s original composition, “The Bells” for chorus and violin will be performed by the Campbell University Choir – featuring Lucy Greenleaf-Carter on violin – on Friday, February 19, 2016. “The Bells” was arranged and set to the Edgar Allen Poe poem of the same name.

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Violinist, Lucy Greenleaf-Carter

Dr. David Mitchell Receives Honorable Mention From the Macro Composers’ Society

Dr. Mitchell’s original composition The Witch’s Hex was given an Honorable Mention at the 2015 Macro Composer’s Society Conference.

 

Dorn Publishes Four David Mitchell Compositions

Screen Shot 2016-01-17 at 5.12.18 PMFour of Dr. David Mitchell’s original compositions are now available on Amazon.com from Dorn Publications, including:

 

How To Make Millions With Your Music Without Signing A Record Deal

Since Apple introduced the iPod in 2001, major labels have gradually lost control of the market. They’re no longer the gatekeepers to success they once were. In fact, with the rise of social media, smartphones and streaming services, it has become unnecessary to sign a record deal.

All you have to do is follow the examples of Emma McGann and Lindsey Stirling

According to the Mirror, Emma McGann is a 25 year old struggling singer who beat George Ezra in the charts, and she’s nipping at the heals of global superstar Ed Sheeran. She started as a local artist performing in clubs and talent shows, but she was unable to attract the attention of major labels. So, she decided to start performing online from her bedroom using a website called YouNow.com. Since October 2014, she has generated 70,000 followers and her debut hit “You Mess Me Up” has reached number 14 in the UK charts. She now makes over £2,000-a-month performing live streaming gigs from her bedroom. Amazing!

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YouNow.com is a live video streaming service, which anyone can join and create a channel to discuss any topic, play music or whatever. Essentially, it’s your own broadcast channel, which anyone in the world can watch without logging in. It’s like having your own cable channel and people can tip you using bitcoin. Viewers can search topics including music channels, which feature a number of live streaming artists 24/7. It’s a huge opportunity for musicians to reach a global audience without a major label.

Lindsey Stirling is a dub step violinist who made $6 million on YouTube without a record label. According to aux, the major labels decided not to sign her in 2007. So she created her own YouTube channel. Her Wild Wild West and Game of Thrones inspired videos have built a huge online following. She makes her money through ad revenue, direct music sales, sponsorships and live performances. The major labels are desperate to sign her now.

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This bottom line is, opportunities for musicians to generate revenue online are only limited by imagination and sweat equity. So grab your instrument, create a marketing plan and start making money.

A Composer’s Inspiration

Click on the picture to read an article about my composition “Lake Avondale” in Decaturish.com. I’m a featured local composer this week! Pretty cool.
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Lake Avondale: A Beautiful Day

A live performance of “Lake Avondale” for classical guitar and piano featuring Jay Kacherski and Lina Morita at The University of Mississippi for Women.

Is It Still Possible to Make a Living as a Private Guitar Instructor?

As a private guitar instructor with over 20 years experience, I have noticed a disconcerting decline in the number of students who sign up for private lessons, and I was curious to learn whether or not other instructors have experienced the same thing. So, I posted the following question to a number of professional groups on LinkedIn including Classical Guitar and Guitar Instructors. Is It Still Possible to Make a Living as a Private Guitar Instructor?

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Out of 45 comments so far, all respondents acknowledged the decline. Most sighted the availability of free instructional videos on YouTube as a major reason for the decline. Walter Peretiatko wrote, “Yes, YouTube has killed a lot of my guitar students…”

In addition, Eric Symons wrote,

“This is a tough subject for me to publicly discuss, as I see a trend that disturbing in the US and other so called “First World” countries. While living in a world that has kids living with inorganic mediums such as video games and computers, and less of them having exposure to music in the schools than any other generation in our history, we must accept a decline in the classical guitar…”

Others pointed to a less vigorous economy. Zane Zirkle wrote, “In a Hope and Change economy, music lessons are a luxury to the average Joe… “ .

Jack Alves wrote, “I too have noticed a slight decline in the over -all teaching biz. From music that’s not all that motivating, to “School of Rock” programs, to students who are willing to forfeit the basics…”

From these responses, it appears there are a variety of factors leading to a decline in the number of students seeking private guitar lessons. The availability of free online content and resources makes it easy for students to learn to play for free in the convenience of their own homes. The sluggish economy and dwindling disposable economy is a factor too. In addition, guitar is no longer the driving force in popular music. Most music is created “in the box” with programs like Ableton eliminating the need to spend years mastering an instrument. Also, there are so many different instant gratification apps, video games, social media sites and digital sources vying for the public’s entertainment time and money. Can an instrument, which requires tremendous personal sacrifice to master, really compete?

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What does this mean for the future of private guitar lessons? It’s clear that the days of making a living solely as a private instructor are gone for now. Guitarists and musicians in general, must develop multiple income streams and embrace technology as an integral part of their skill set. For the 21st century musician, it will no longer be viable to simply play or teach an instrument. Lessons will always be a piece of the puzzle, but today’s musicians must know how to write for commercials, film, video games, record voice over, distribute and promote themselves online and through social media. If you have the right skill set, technology becomes a tremendous tool to sell your music and skills to a wider public than ever before.

Most schools and universities are developing music and technology degrees to meet the needs of today’s musicians. For example, Gwinnett County Public Schools now offer courses in music technology which focus on recording, composition, film score and video game composition. Private schools such as The Atlanta Institute of Music and Media also offer degrees in music and technology, job placement and industry contacts, so the future is not bleak, just different than the 80s or 90s.

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I agree with Derek Stottlemyer, who wrote, “As a web architect I see a lot of options, and online offers the opportunity to earn passive or residual income in addition to paid lessons – but instructors have to break the mold and be willing to try new things.” Indeed!

2014 Society of Composers National Conference

The 2014 Society of Composers National Conference took place March 20-22 at Ball State University in Muncie, Indiana. It featured three days of concerts and paper sessions in Sursa Performance Hall by select composers from across the US. The conference wordpress blog and facebook page contain specific details regarding the concert schedule and events. The overall quality of the concerts and paper sessions was excellent!

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Inside Sursa

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notably, the majority of concerts featured electronic resources and multimedia. To be sure, there were a number of pieces with traditional acoustic instruments and some old school electroacoustic music with outstanding spatialization enhanced by Sursa’s eight-speaker configuration which enveloped the audience. That being said, many, if not a major of pieces on the program featured both acoustic instruments and either prerecorded electronic accompany or manipulation of live sound in real time. Some pieces also contained video projection in which case, a video screen was lowered above the stage.

audienceIt is exciting to note that 21st century composers are embracing technology and multimedia. With all of the new resources available to composers, it seems that composers of new music are blurring the lines between electronic and acoustic music. This most assuredly will be an area of research for some musicologist in the not too distance future.

In addition, many of the paper sessions discussed topics related to emerging technologies and live performance. For example, Zachary Boyt discussed MIDI bows, while Orlando Legname presented electronic sensors for conducting which interact with MAX/MSP in real time.

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It was a great conference. I’m definitely planning to attend the 2015 conference. I would recommend it to all composers of new music who wish to stay abreast of the latest developments in new music.

By the way, I was a presenter at the first paper session on Friday, March 21. My paper was entitled Metamorphoses Nocturnes a Stepping Stone in the Compositional Development of Gyorgy Ligeti.

mephoto(6)Here are a number of links to photos and other media from the conference:

https://twitter.com/Music_comp/media

https://www.dropbox.com/sh/qgo8nrk7t8l6te0/V_HOi3Dh3D

Special thanks to Michael Pounds, Keith Kothman and Jim Rhinehart for organizing such a great conference. If I have left anyone out, my apologizes. Please send me your name and a link to your blog and/or website, and I can include it in this blog. Thanks again! See you in 2015.